USEFUL TIPS

There is a series of free trading lessons, which consists of 10 topics that traders, both beginners and experienced traders, should find them very useful.

The 10 Free Trading Lessons will cover the following topics:

(1) The importance of psychology in price movement.
(2) How to spot mega trends.
(3) Understanding of technical price objectives.
(4) How to picture price objectives.
(5) How to trade with moving averages.
(6) How to use point and figure trading techniques.
(7) How to use the RSI indicator.
(8) How to correctly use stochastics in your trading.
(9) How to use the ADX indicator to capture trends.
(10) How to capitalize on natural market cycles.

On top of the above, you will learn all about Fibonacci retracements, MACD, Bollinger Bands, and much more.

These 10 free trading lessons will be sent via email.

In order to get this, just fill out the form here. Then you should be able to get it started right away. Hope this info can be useful to you.

Sunday, September 27, 2009

Trading Quotes from “Way of the Turtle” by Curtis Faith – Part 1

About 25 years ago, trading guru Richard Dennis reportedly said to his long-time friend William Eckhardt, a friend and fellow trader. Dennis believed that successful trading could be taught. This started a bet between them about whether great traders were born or made. To settle this debate, Dennis recruited and trained 21 men and 2 women, and this became a legendary trading experiment.
Dennis trained his Turtles, as he called them, for only two weeks. Then he gave each of them a million dollars of his own money to manage, and turned each one loose on the markets. When his experiment ended five years later, his Turtles reportedly had earned an aggregate profit of $175 million.

Curtis Faith is one of the Turtles. One of his book is Way of the Turtle: The Secret Methods that Turned Ordinary People into Legendary Traders.





Found good trading quotes from this book… with deep meaning.
Here they are:

Human emotion is both the source of opportunity in trading and the greatest challenge.
Master it and you will succeed.
Ignore it at your peril.

Trade with an edge, manage risk, be consistent, and keep it simple.
The entire Turtle training, and indeed the basis of all successful trading, can be summed up in these four core principles.

Good trading is not about being right, it’s about trading right.
If you want to be successful, you need to think of the long run and ignore the outcomes of individual trades.

Trading with an edge is what separates the professionals from amateurs.
Ignore this and you will be eaten by those who don’t.

Edges are found in the places between the battleground between buyers and sellers.
Your task as a trader is to find those places and wait to see who wins and who loses.

Mature understanding of and respect of risk is the hallmark of the best traders.
They know if you don’t keep an eye of risk, it will set its eye on you.

Ruin is the risk you should be concerned with the most.
It can come like a thief in the night and steal everything if you’re not watching carefully.

Continue to Part 2.

Related Topics:
* Free Trading Educational Video: Learn Technical Tips from Dan Gramza
* Option Greek
* Understanding Implied Volatility (IV)
* Understanding Option’s Time Value
* Learning Candlestick Charts
* Learning Charts Patterns

Tuesday, September 22, 2009

Market Analysis Video: What’s Going to Happen in the S&P 500 Market?

The S&P 500 has made remarkable recovery from the lows that were seen earlier this year.
However, is the recent upward price move going to continue?
There are two major technical indicators that are colliding at a crucial point and time.
The upward moves might potentially come to an end as the market approaches this strategic level.
Unless you’re aware of these indicators, it could be very expensive.

So, watch this video to find the analysis on this market.
I believe you’ll benefit from this interesting video, and also learn something from it.

In addition, if you want to improve your trading knowledge even more, do learn from these 10 Trading Lessons as well. It’s FREE, informative and educational.

Analysis Tool:
Get Free Trend Analysis for your favorite symbols

Related Topics:
* Trading Video: FIBONACCI RETRACEMENT RULES
* Trading Tips Video: Using TREND LINES in Analyzing the Market
* Trading Tips Video: Fibonacci Retracement, Support/Resistance, Stop Loss, Price Target
* Learning Candlestick Charts
* Learning Charts Patterns

Monday, September 14, 2009

Trailing Stop Limit Order

Trailing Stop Limit Order is similar to Trailing Stop Order, whereby the Trailing Stop Price will be “trailing” below or above the movement of the security’s market price, depending on whether it is on a long or short position, to maintain the set distance, which is either stipulated as an absolute dollar or as a percentage of the market price.

The main difference is that for Trailing Stop Limit Order, when the Stop Price is passed, the order will be converted into a Limit Order, whereas for Trailing Stop Order, it’ll convert into a Market Order.

Hence, for Trailing Stop Limit Order, when the market price hits or passes the Stop Price, the order would convert into a Limit Order to buy / sell the security at the specified Limit Price or better.

As a result, Trailing Stop Limit Order carries a big risk, as the order may never get filled if the market price is worse than the Limit Price. As a result, the position can continue falling with no more protection for the position. This makes Trailing Stop Limit Order a very insecure stop loss method, particularly for the extremely volatile stocks that often experience a gap up or gap down in prices.
Due to this risk, using Trailing Stop Limit Order to protect a position is not advisable.

Depending on the position on the market you have (long or short), there are 2 types of Trailing Stop Limit Order:
a) Sell Trailing Stop Limit Order (Trailing Stop Limit to Sell)
This is the trailing stop order when you have a long position on a security.
In this case, the Trailing Stop Price is placed at a set distance (e.g. Trailing Amount) below current market price of the security.
In addition, the Trailing Limit Price will also need to be specified as a certain distance (e.g. Limit Offset) from the Stop Price, whereby the Limit Price should be at a least the same or lower than the Stop Price.

The Stop Price will then rise as the market price increases (i.e. The Stop Price will be trailing the increasing market price from below: Stop Price = Increasing Market Price – Trailing Amount).
However, the Stop Price will remain the same (will not go lower) when the market price decreases.
Once the market price hits or passes Stop Price, the order would convert into a Limit Order to sell the security at the Limit Price (Limit Price = Stop Price – Limit Offset) or better (i.e. at Limit Price or higher, because for selling, the higher the price, the better).

b) Buy Trailing Stop Limit Order (Trailing Stop Limit to Buy)
This is the trailing stop order when you have a short position on a security.
In this case, the Trailing Stop Price is placed at a set distance (e.g. Trailing Amount) above current market price of the security.
In addition, the Trailing Limit Price will also need to be specified as a certain distance (e.g. Limit Offset) from the Stop Price, whereby the Limit Price should be at a least the same or higher than the Stop Price.

The Stop Price will then move lower as the market price decreases (i.e. The Stop Price will be trailing the decreasing market price from above: Stop Price = Decreasing Market Price + Trailing Amount).
However, the Stop Price will remain the same (will not go higher) when the market price increases.
Once the market price hits or passes Stop Price, the order would convert into a Limit Order to buy the security at the Limit Price (Limit Price = Stop Price + Limit Offset) or better (i.e. at Limit Price or lower, because for buying, the lower the price, the better)

Note:
When placing Trailing Stop Limit Order for an Option, the order will be triggered based on the market price of the option, NOT the market price of the underlying stock. Therefore, the Stop Price should be set based on the option’s price as well.

Therefore, just remember how the price of Call and Put options are related to the underlying stock price:
For a Call option, the option’s price increases when the underlying stock’s price increases, and decreases when the underlying stock’s price decreases (positive relationship).
On the other hand, for a Put option, the option’s price increases when the underlying stock’s price decreases, and decreases as the underlying stock’s price increases (negative relationship).

Example:
Suppose the stock price ABC is on a downtrend. You expect that the stock price ABC will continue to drop further. To take advantage of this opportunity, you short-sell the stock at $20, and place a Buy Trailing Stop Limit order with Trailing Amount = $0.3 and Limit Offset = $0.2.
In this case, the initial Buy Stop Price will be $20.3 and the initial Limit Price is 20.5.
When the stock price falls to $19, the Buy Stop Price will adjust accordingly to $19.3 and Limit Price to $19.5.
If the stock price continues to drop further to $18, the Buy Stop Price will adjust to $18.3 and Limit Price to $18.5.
Suddenly, the stock price stops to drop and begins to increase. In this case, the Buy Stop Price will remain at $18.3. Once the Stop Price of $18.3 is hit, the order will convert into a Limit Order to buy back the stocks at the price $18.5 or lower.
As with the risk of Stop Limit Order, this order may never get filled if the market price is worse than the Limit Price. Hence, the position can continue falling with no more protection for the position.
In this example, suppose the stock price gaps up to $27 and continue to increase, the order will never get filled. This makes Trailing Stop Limit Order a risky method for protecting a position / taking profit, and hence not advisable.

For the list of other types of order, go to: Types of Orders in Trading.

Related Topics:
* Free Trading Educational Video: Learn Technical Tips from Dan Gramza
* Option Greek
* Understanding Implied Volatility (IV)
* Understanding Option’s Time Value
* Learning Candlestick Charts
* Learning Charts Patterns

Wednesday, September 2, 2009

Market Analysis Video: Where is Nasdaq heading to?

Nasdaq market is showing a negative divergence on the MACD indicator. Is it really a sign that the market may potentially move back downward?
Find out more detailed analysis on the current Nasdaq market in this video.

Learn how to use MACD Divergence to find the clue of a potential market turning, and how to combine the analysis with Fibonacci tool.
Hope you can benefit from this. :)

Analysis Tool:
Get Free Trend Analysis for your favorite symbols

Related Topics:
* Candlestick Charts
* Learning Charts Patterns